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How to be happy at work

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013 | Latest News | Leave a response

A staggering 80% of people are said to be unhappy at work. Read our tips for how to avoid being one of them.

Experts say that workplace happiness depends on three key factors – capacity, satisfaction and environment. While some elements are outside your control, there are things you can do to improve your situation.

Get organised. Worrying about missing deadlines and constantly feeling as if you are running just to stand still are major causes of stress and unhappiness.  If your workload is daunting, use project management tools to help you stay in control, only commit to what you can realistically do, and flag it up to your boss if you are genuinely trying to do the work of two people or there is some glitch in the system that makes your job harder yet could be easily fixed.

Make your space your own.  The majority of people in the creative industries work at a desk, and it’s more pleasant if we have a bit of personal stuff around us, whether it’s a photo, a favourite coffee mug or a management doll to stick pins in. It’s been proved to be beneficial to give people a unique space to manage as they see fit, while petty rules about what can and can’t be on display de-motivate people and don’t have any commercial advantage. A few years ago HMRC announced that family photos, memorabilia and packed lunches were all banned from desks while calculators and pens were smiled upon, sparking a work to rule and overtime ban that cost the taxpayer thousands.

If you don’t get regular feedback, go and ask for it. Most of us recognise when we are doing a good job, but make sure you know how others view your performance too. A boss who confirms you are meeting the grade will be able to help you improve if you’re not.

Take control. No one is more interested in your career than you (and us lovely folk at Concept Personnel of course), so work out where you want to go professionally and ask for support to get there. Feeling that you have a say in your direction promotes happiness and decreases stress.

Set yourself some aims, either professional or personal. Goal setting is used by athletes and entrepreneurs to increase motivation and performance.  Seeing progress boosts your self-esteem, increases your satisfaction and spills over into other areas of your life.

Accept responsibility for yourself. Don’t sit in your corner complaining that no one tells you what’s going on. It’s not other people’s job to educate you or make you feel involved, so make it your business to ask questions and keep up to date with developments.

Choose happiness. Yeah, we know it sounds a bit hippyish, but refuse to accept negativity. Walk away from those “isn’t it awful” conversations and gossip corners. You can’t change people but you can alter how you react to them. Negative people will drag you down, just as happiness is catching.

Find something that you like about your job. Even small things like your colleagues are a great bunch, or you work near to home, stress the positives and alter your viewpoint.

So what happens if you’ve tried all that and you still can’t turn your job back into the one you used to love?

There’s no shame in admitting that things have changed, and life is too short to hang about doing something you hate. Maybe it’s time to drop in at Concept Personnel for a chat, and start the search for a shiny new job that will put a spring back in your step.

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